Toggle Menu

Around Somerton

fancy2_white

Somerton is an ancient Saxon town and was the possession of the Saxon kings. This was true until well after the Middle Ages. During the Saxon inhabitation, the town was sparsely populated.

rose_black

It was only during the Roman period that the town grew bigger and bigger and eventually became the capital of Wessex. The first signs of Roman inhabitation in the area are dated to around A.D. 48. The district was scattered with Roman villas, remains of which have been found in nearby Pitney and Low Ham.

The West Saxons colonised the town during the 100 years after the demise of the Roman Empire in Britain. They soon pillaged and destroyed the Roman villas in the area.

If you want to spend a day relaxing, enjoying lovely food, beautiful scenery and old town charm, Somerton is the place to visit.

There are many delights within the town including an old market place with a lovely Buttercross which is floodlit at night. Around and in the Market Place you can find the old Town Hall, alms houses, the old courthouse which is now The Somerset Guild of Craftsmen, Courthouse Gallery.

Golf

Equestrian

Shooting

Fishing

Hot Air Ballooning

Walks & Outdoors

We hold a number of walking guide books, leaflets and OS maps behind the bar for guests to consult or borrow.

Ham Hill – a 164 hectare (390 acres) country park centered on an Iron Age hillfort. There is extensive parking on site and plenty of open hilly landscape to explore.

Cheddar Gorge – Explore the caves, take an open bus tour or experience rock climbing!

Glastonbury Tor – enjoy a walk up to the top of this iconic and evocative landmark which offers magnificent views of the Somerset Levels, Dorset, Wiltshire and Wales.

West Sedgemoor RSPB reserve

River Parrett Trail – Or something for those who prefer the longer distances.

Local Attractions

Longleat Safari Park and House

Glastonbury (often associated with the famous music festival, which is actually held a few miles down the road in Pilton) is well worth a visit. Dominated by The Tor (a National Trust monument which affords wonderful views across the county to the Bristol Channel on a clear day), it has been a place of pilgrimage for over a thousand years. Visit the ruined abbey and also the many shops and cafes which line the main street.

Somerset is home to many National Trust houses and gardens. A few of these include:

  • Montacute house
  • Lytes Cary
  • Stourhead and King Alfred’s tower
  • Barrington Court
  • TIntinhull Gardens

For more information visit: www.nationaltrust.org.uk

Nearby Wells is the smallest cathedral city in England. You can hear evensong in the cathedral daily. For times visit: www.wellscathedral.org.uk

There are also regular concerts held in the cathedral.

Other places of interest in Wells include The Bishop’s Palace, the Museum and the historic market place (with a fresh produce and craft market held there every Wednesday and Saturday).

Museums

Theatres

Arts & Crafts

A unique and exciting arts and crafts centre based in the Somerset levels:
www.somersetcrafts.com

The Somerset Arts Week celebrates the talent of all the local artists:
www.somersetartworks.org.uk

Pampering

  • Somerton Hair & Beauty: West Street Chapel House Somerton, Somerset TA11 7PR
  • 014582 72910

Shopping

Somerton has some lovely local, independent shops which you might like to explore throughout the town.

Further afield you might want to try:

The quarterly antiques markets held at the Bath and West Showground near Shepton Mallet: www.bathandwest.com

The Mulberry Factory Shop, Shepton Mallet and also Kilver Court: www.kilvercourt.com

Clarks Village – a retail outlet park

For larger, high street shopping and city attractions visit Taunton, Bath or Bristol.

For Children

Not forgetting the children, Somerton offers a play area, skate park, floodlit tennis courts, basketball courts and rugby and football pitches. Not so far away there is also the:

Book a Room

Rates from £85, click here for more details on rooms and rates.

Close